Value Based Healthcare

King’s Health Partners is committed to improving the value and outcomes of the care we provide.

As the costs of healthcare rise it is increasingly important to demonstrate that healthcare funding is spent efficiently, such as by ensuring better outcomes for patients, improving patients’ experiences of our services, translating new discoveries into better care and developing an excellent workforce. We're committed to spending wisely to achieve the best value in these areas. Our approach is underpinned by comprehensive and accurate data about our patients and services.

How?

Recording and analysing accurate information is essential to understanding the value of what we do. Our Clinical Academic Groups (CAGs) are developing measures to understand value and see where there are variations in quality of care. We are publishing an outcomes book for each CAG, so that readers can see the value of what we do and our progress in patient care, research and education. We are leading the way nationally in this routine collation and publishing of outcomes.

Our Strategy

We know that that we will only achieve sustainable health improvement if we strive always to increase value. We are determined therefore to contribute to the sustainability, as well as the excellence of healthcare. To guide our actions in driving increased value we have developed this Value Based Healthcare Strategy.

We are committed to providing accurate and timely information about patient care and outcomes. We believe that identifying, measuring and publishing healthcare outcomes, building cohesive information systems, reducing variation and developing a culture of improvement will increase value. Our Value Based Healthcare Strategy will be a dynamic one and we will update it on a regular basis. We welcome feedback from all partners and stakeholders, including patients and carers, which could enhance our pursuit of value.

Get Involved

Look for events

The NHS has always strived to improve quality and reduce costs. That issue is coming into even sharper focus, given the context of unprecedented financial constraint and the calls for efficiency savings of £22 billion from the NHS five year forward view. However, focusing on the monetary value of the challenge risks missing the real essence of the task facing the NHS, which is about getting better value from the NHS budget. This means maximising the outcomes produced by the activities the NHS carries out, while minimising their costs. Framing the debate in terms of efficiency and costs also risks losing the opportunity to engage clinical staff in the challenge of changing the way in which care is delivered.
The King’s Fund, Better Value in the NHS, 2015